Friday, October 11, 2019

Becky Boyle

Interior Design by Becky Boyle

I couldn't be more happy to write this post! A dear friend of mine with talent that consistently wows me each and every time I see something she creates, has quite possibly created THE most gorgeous dining room ever! 

A little background, Becky (a North Carolina native) and I met on Instagram and I had the great joy of meeting her and her husband when Tyler and I had a long layover in Los Angeles this past April. Becky is as beautiful as she is talented, just being around her you pick up the pep of the massive amounts of positive energy she exudes. It wasn't a shock to me when she told me that she was going to be a part of the Southern Living Magazine showhouse outside of Nashville this year. 

When she first sent the plans over the room, I had no idea how she'd work with such an odd space. I mean, a fireplace in the crook of a room? But she did it, and in her quintessentially elegant feminine way. 

The house is open as part of the Grove Parade of Homes starting today until October 27th, so if you're near Nashville, head over and take a look at the house, get tickets here. If you're not (like me) I'm just as sad as you are! But you can follow along with Becky and her beautiful projects on her instagram page, here

Congrats Becky, it's beautiful! 





Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Sarah Bartholomew Design in Connecticut

Interior Design by Sara Bartholomew, Photo by Melanie Acevedo 


A few days ago, this photo of a recent project interior designer Sarah Bartholomew completed in Connecticut was published on instagram. It is one photo featured in the newest book by Carl Dellatore, titled "On Style" by Rizzoli.

I loved this, and dug around a little more to see if I could find any other pictures of the space, and while not currently available on her website, there are a few photos (both finished and in progress) available on her instagram

Interior Design by Sara Bartholomew, Photo by Melanie Acevedo 

An avid real estate junky, I actually know this house. 

BEFORE

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER 

BEFORE

AFTER

This photo shows that the walls are covered in beautiful Iksel Decorative Arts paper. 

AFTER

Showing the cabinetry adorned with hand-painted plates from Milan, the Iksel paper, and Les Indiennes curtains. 

BEFORE

AFTER

A small vignette that was shared from the photo shoot, Soane Britain slipper chairs in a Mark D. Sikes for Schumacher fabric. Unfortunately, the rest of the photos of the house seem to be held pretty close to the belt, probably being shopped to magazines for publishing. Here's what we do know though. 

The estate was purchased in 2017, and the family who purchased it quickly had Sarah hop on board. They're prior home was not far away, and they've opted to rent the house rather than sell. The didn't work with a decorator on that home, or any other that they've had it seems. 

I wonder what you all think of the transformation thus far? Personally, I find the custom plates on the recess of those pantry doors in the formal dining room to be a  GENIUS way to deal with that expanse of paneling. More of the house, including this living room is featured in the book, and available in the preview on amazon, here: 

Monday, September 9, 2019

Sean Anderson Design Before and After


On the surface, this large home on more than four acres in East Memphis doesn't look like it'd have a large spread in a national magazine like Elle Decor, does it? That's because this ... is the before.


The after. Well, if I'm reading the article correctly, this is more of a during. When Sean and his then partner moved into the home, they formulated a tiered plan to turn the house into their forever home, a dream they called a modern farmhouse. 


When they bought the house, this was the entry. Built in the late 1980's, the house had all the hallmarks of the era. Engineered hardwood with a bowling ball polish, oak, oak, and more oak, plush carpet and some pretty interesting faux paint finishes.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

After, carpet was replaced with the same engineered wood, and then painted white. Every wall in the house was painted a deep shade of gray except for a guest room at the end of this hallway. The stair carpeting was replaced with sisal, and lighting was switched out for higher end fixtures like this lantern.


Immediately to the right of the entry is the dining room. This room is bathed with natural light that shines through a beautiful bay window.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website


Another before.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Sean and his then partner were more keen to have this room be a sitting room, a room to start their mornings with coffee and conversation rather than a stodgy dining room rarely used soaking up all that gorgeous sunshine. This room, more than any other, changed the most while Sean lived there. Art went from this beautiful collection of arrowheads collected at his family farm in Mississippi:

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

To this large painting by Alabama artist, William Rankin McLure IV, which Sean used in a spec house he was charged to decorate. I think it lived here until the install. 


After a year of collecting actual arrows, they were framed, and I believe this is how the art in the room stands today:




The living room obviously saw several changes as well.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Two vignettes with tables on either side of the door. Sean lined the walls of the entire room gallery style with photographs, paintings, and various taxidermy.


Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website


The kitchen was part of the last tier of the renovation, and there are no finished pics of that space. But Sean did clean up this little eating nook. 

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

There are two master suites on the first floor.


This one has a window that faces the front of the house, and was used as an office by the previous owner.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website


Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

The plush carpet was replaced with wall to wall sisal carpet, and this room (the only with white walls in the whole house) had windows treated with beautiful men's suiting wool.


The other master, upstairs.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

The same carpet was used in all of the upstairs rooms. The couple turned what had been a closet in an adjoining room into a daybed with shelves for books.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

It proved to also be a great dog bed.

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website


Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

 
Photo by Alyssa Rosenheck from Sean Anderson Design Website

I thought it was so great to see someone not only tackle, but conquer the black and white color palette in this way. So, now that you're sufficiently inspired, wanna shop the look for less?

 

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Sneak Peek


If you're following me on Instagram, you've already seen this. But - for those of you who aren't on instagram - and for those of you who follow so many people things get lost in the shuffle, I present to you a sneak peek at the new decor of my living room.

I know you've been wondering what the heck was going on over here and so I figure it was probably best to polish things up a bit and get a sneak peek photo for y'all to take in until I get it all pulled together.

One thing I learned living in a space that is about 830 square feet (BTW: That's smaller than some of these other blogger's bedrooms) is that every room needs to have function. I fought against that for a long time, deciding I needed to have pretty photos for the blog and instagram, and leaving more than 1/2 of the VERY SMALL apartment unused most of the time, although inspiring.

So with a new goal in mind - having functional and beautiful spaces - I switched it up. I'm still not finished, but in this view you can take in what has probably become my favorite piece of furniture, a Scandinavian pine cupboard turned television cabinet. It's the PERFECT size to hold nearly all of the design books I kept after paring down, and random TV equipment. Wires from the television are hidden as best as possible with beautiful coffee table books and a bowl I bought in Lima, Peru filled with moss.

Another of my trinkets in the background, a 200 POUND concrete urn, with the most beautiful patina holds a dracena tree that I've yet to kill over that last 3-years, potted with fresh moss I collected from around trees in our neighborhood.

The space will feature slipcovered furniture mostly due to the ease of washing as we live with two rambunctious pups. The chairs seen here are done in the most glorious shade of gray linen. The same gray, luckily and unplanned, as the cotton roller shades you see on the windows. Curtains are no longer, that space now filled with art and sun-washed turtle shells.

I'm still looking for a large deacons bench for in front of the window, which will have a striped linen cushion, and some gorgeous antique textile pillows.

Wanna shop the look? 


Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Mark D. Sikes' Head to Toe Makeover

So if you missed it, last week I did a "Look for Less" on the new living room decor at designer Mark D. Sikes' private home in the Hollywood Hills, which he shares with his partner Michael and their French Bulldog, Lily

My inbox was flooded with messages about the new decor, and more than one request to show a full series of before and afters of the room from the time they moved into the home til now. 

It's not a shock that Sikes has provided a lot of inspiration to those of us interested in interior design, first with his gigantic welcome to the "scene" with the cover spread of his home in House Beautiful, but then his book, featuring two versions of his decor along with various client projects. 

I happen to have my favorite version of his home, and have cataloged a lot of images for inspiration, so this task was relatively easy! So, for those of you who asked, sit back, relax, and enjoy the evolution of a living room - the Mark D. Sikes way.   


I think any good before and after post has to start with the REAL before, don't you? When Mark and Michael bought the house in 2010, it had been decorated by the previous owner. It's possible she hired a decorator to do this for her. A young actress, she definitely had an aesthetic that was unique. Black high-gloss paint coated all of the moldings of the windows and doors, and that plaster fireplace surround. The floors were painted, sort of two shades lighter than battleship gray, and the room was wallpapered in a tone on tone damask. She ended up selling the house at a small loss, likely due to the general problems that surfaced after the house had ended up being too much to handle and upkeep fell way behind.

Snatching up the amazing deal,  Mark and Michael got right to work after moving into the house in the summer of 2010. Mark had all the wallpaper removed, the floors sanded down, bleached, and waxed. The moldings were painted white, and that paint that had coated the plaster work on the columns and the fireplace surround carefully peeled back to reveal the detail beneath. 

After the interior of the home was finished, the couple began work creating the terraced back yard and brick courtyard we've all come to covet. With some landscaping questions looming, Mark asked a neighbor (who just so happened to be a scout and editor of House Beautiful) over for some advice on the garden. That, my friends, is how it all started. 


Test shots of the entire house were taken to send to the editors of House Beautiful in 2011. And if you've ever been asked to send scout shots to a magazine, you  know they want all the lights on, and full room shots. House Beautiful was clearly impressed, and in short order Mark's house was soon the subject of every internet blog, including this one. 

Now that you've got the beginning all burned into your brain ... let's get started with three versions of this room, photo by photo - frame by frame.

FULL VIEW

VERSION I: 2012


VERSION II: 2014


VERSION III: 2018


The changes in version three began in the Spring of 2018, and by July of 2018, this room was fully decorated with just snips released on his instagram, until AD published a few photos this summer.

THE LARGE ARCHED WINDOW

Version I: 2012


Version II: 2014


Version III: 2018


THE RIGHT CORNER AT STAIRS TO FOYER

Version I : 2012


Version II: 2014


Version III: 


THE LEFT CORNER AT STAIRS

Version I: 2012


Version II: 2014



Version III: 2018


LEFT CORNER AT ARCHED WINDOW

Version I: 2012



Version II: 2014


Version III: 2018


RIGHT CORNER AT ARCHED WINDOW

Version I: 2012


Version II: 2014


Version III: 2018


FIREPLACE

Version I: 2012


Version II: 2014


Version III: 2018



So there you have it, all four corners of the room - scene by scene. I wonder which is your favorite, and if you'll be able to guess mine? If you'd like to take a closer look at his decor, you can always check out his website here, his instagram account here, the Mark D. Sikes Interiors instagram here, or you can purchase his book:



One thing is for sure, there are some consistencies throughout all three versions of this room: 

BLUE AND WHITE PORCELAIN

There are pieces that are repeated in all versions, but most notably are the jardineres that Mark's ficus are planted in. 


One photo shows the interior of the jardinere, with beautiful green moss covering the root ball of the tree. 


This has long been regarded as my favorite way to treat the visible layer of dirt in any pot, something I happened to pick up from Joan of fortheloveofahouse who uses both fresh moss she picks up in her forest walks with her husband and four beautiful puppies, but also spanish moss. 


I say mix and match! Some pots with Spanish moss, some with green preserved or even live if you can find it! 

You can find great prices on blue and white porcelain accessories throughout Amazon, but here are a few of my favorites: 


ANTIQUE BRASS LIGHTING

The gorgeous lamps that Mark has in his living room are trade only and expensive. Known as the grasshopper floor lamp from Galeries de Lampes, the lamps are a huge splurge - if you have the patience to wait for one. But there are other options: 


DECORATIVE BOXES 

Decorative boxes dot nearly every surface in the room, from the coffee table in version one, to the octagonal skirted table in version two, to the fireplace in version three. Here are some of my favorites: 


BOOKS, BOOKS, AND MORE BOOKS! 

Without a doubt, one thing that never changes in any room of Mark's house are the copious volumes of coffee table and design books. Whether stacked next to a chair to create drink table, piled artfully under benches or tables, or neatly shelved in a bookcase - they're on display ... and many are quite expensive. There are a few coffee table books that seem to be on at least one surface in EVERY designer's home, and high-end magazine features across the board: 


But there are some that I think are both wholly inspiring AND beautiful to look at that aren't going to cost you hundreds of dollars each: 


Hope you enjoyed a look into the corners of the room in all three versions of the decor. It seems from all my research that every 4-years there's been a substantial change, so if you're not a fan of the decor this time around, 2022 may have your name on it!