Monday, December 10, 2012

French Door Shutters

Well, while a fireplace, a chicken coop and free range field may not be in the cards for a few different reasons - I definitely know that a courtyard and french doors are definitely happening! I know I need two sets of each ... just making a decision on making my own or buying antique ... what would you do?


Easy enough to make, just need the hardware! 


Probably the easiest of all of them to make ... old barn style. Love them, but not so sure they'd look like this when not against Provence limestone mansions.


I think even though these would be easy to make, they wouldn't look nearly as stunning without the arch.


Here they are ... without the arch. Of course notice the windows are louvered, the doors are planked. Not quite the look I'm after.


Same here, and no way I can make louvered shutters myself. 


More simple linear plank, again with the curve. Would we love this without the arch? I don't think so.


Unless, of course - they looked like this on a house like this. 


A bit cheaper than the louvered, and not necessary to source genuine antique. 

All photos via Pinterest

So, in using these photos for their intended purpose, I have gained some good ideas. Here's one of them:


Using pine louvered bi-fold closet doors gives me the louvers I'd like to have, in the height that I need! All for $80 for the pair. Can you get a better deal than that on real wood shutters? Once painted, and with weather protection from the eave overhang ... I think they'd not only work - they'd look a lot like this: 


Ah, yes - in fact, look at how many other elements of this sing to me! Pebble patio, boxwood, french doors with louvered shutters ... 


I also love this copper portico over these french doors, of course those hedges, brick, and louvered shutters are just as nice! 


Of course, if there were a way to make those new shutters look like these - I'd definitely be on that wagon. Love that destroyed/decayed look. Especially against stone. 

Photos via Pinterest



14 comments:

  1. Artie I am amazed that you were considering making the shutters at all!
    I think the last option is a good one!
    Come see me soon!

    2012 Artists Series,
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  2. Lots of great ideas. The guy who built my house built the shutters and they look pretty good, but he didn't use hinges (unfortunately). (I am the 3rd owner of the house, so I didn't have a say in it.) You can take a look at them here, if you'd like. My house is the first picture in the post. http://www.ivyclad.com/2012/04/for-love-of-ivy.html

    Cheers!
    Keri

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  3. Totally agree with Karen. Why make them if you feel the doors will suffice. Only drawback is painting or staining them as it can be time consuming, but will be well worth the effort. For hardware you may want to take a peek at Lee Valley Tools website. You may find something there that appeals to you. Warm hugs -Brenda-

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  4. Oh please! Just make sure they are wide enough to work and cover the doors!!! Or have a pair on each side!

    No shutters are better than fake skinny "falsies"!!

    Our carpenter made ours and left them in the rain!!

    http://tginteriors.blogspot.com (ist pic of guest house)

    they are on hinges and they cover the windows and doors!

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  5. Great inspiration pics....I too just adore shutters :o) Can't wait to see what you come up with!
    ~Des

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  6. You can check around on CL for ones that are used and get a set or two to try out. Recently on the local CL here there was about 6 sets.

    If new:
    use Penetrol (product usually used for thinning paint for sprayers) directly on the wood as a preservative, this will help the joints and parts to stay together through moisture swelling and shrinking out of doors.

    Hit the doors in random areas to give dents and damage. You can also sand the edges so they are not so square and new looking.

    Paint with primer like kiltz or similar (is more translucent than paint and seals too). Do it with a dry brush (wiping off the excess paint on the rim of the can) and do not apply all over, leave bare areas.

    You can apply Vaseline first in some areas you do not want paint to stick, and it will leave bare areas.

    I like the idea of using two shutters hinged on each side sort of half open and more three dimensional.

    What a GREAT project to do the French doors! I can't wait to see how they come out!

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  7. Amazing post!!!
    I love visiting your gorgeous blog! You never disappoint us!
    Thank you for posting all these beautiful articles!
    xx
    Greet

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  8. I'm not so sure but I got a feeling that we can also use these shutters with other combination as well. French doors shutters are best I guess!

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  9. The photos above simply show that French doors are suitable to any style of a house. Whether you have a contemporary or a country house, you can use French doors to beautify your home. However, if you want to add a more dramatic appeal to them, you should consider putting shutters. These two are a really great combination. I noticed it with the beautiful European houses I see on the magazines.

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  10. Thanks for the information. It would be nice to have Quality wooden doors that would surely last and durable. Makes your money worth it.

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  11. Shutters can become really expensive especially if you have huge windows in your house. I know a shop that sells exterior wood shutters in our area and they even helped me with the budget and design. Shutters can definitely add elegance and improve the architecture of any structure.

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  12. With shutters, windows can have more protection against the rain and direct sunlight. The person inside can enjoy more price

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  13. for continuation.

    value and aesthetic value.

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